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Hip-Hop Prevents Suicide

Hip-Hop Prevents Suicide

Hip-Hop Prevents Suicide

Friday.Oct.02.2020
Survival Kit Neon Cassette UV Light Blacklight
 

A Broken-Hearted Collective

 

One year ago today, I released a rap video on Facebook about depression and suicide prevention. It was an extremely emotional moment for me that my friend happened to catch on camera. The lyrics are about the depression I’ve experienced, thoughts of suicide, and how I keep going forward.

 

Since then, miracles started happening.

 

MIRACLE #1:   That video reached over 10 million people and has been shared  142 thousand times.  There are over   4,000 comments,  many people tag their friends to bridge the gap for an important conversation they want to have about their own struggles. Others are publicly sharing their pain, taking the risk to put themselves out there like I did.
 

MIRACLE #2:    A shocking amount of people said the video talked them off the ledge and saved their life. 
 

MIRACLE #3:  A “Broken Hearted Collective” was formed. I use quotes because those are the words from one of the fan comments that really got me (see below). The video’s Facebook comment feed became the  safe space  some people needed. They feel understood from the video, I reply to their comments and messages, and so do strangers from all around the world. I never knew there were so many people in pain like me, or that there was so much help.

 

 

A Life-Saving Survival Kit

 

Since that day, I have devoted my time and energy to a special project for that Broken Hearted Collective. It’s called Survival Kit.  

First, I recorded the rap into a full song, produced by 14Trak, along with 6 other songs that help me get through rough days. Give the “Survival Kit” EP a listen in the music player at the bottom!  

Second, I created an actual Survival Kit for my fans. It contains:

• All 7 songs from the “Survival Kit” EP along with videos
• A floatable SOS keychain
• A sticker
• A Survival Card  containing emergency contact hotlines and a mental health checklist.

Available on CD or Flashtape. Never seen a Flashtape before? It’s a USB drive in the shape of a cassette tape (see below). That’s how I make sure my fans get videos and other cool content. I put a copy of that Facebook video on there, just incase it helps someone in an emergency when they don’t have WiFi to go on Facebook.

I.T. Official Branded Flashdrive Product Shot

 

A Free Virtual Music Experience

 

I wanted to create a way for people to experience the tape Survival Kit for free, from any device.

My answer to that inspiration was to create a Survival Kit Virtual Music Experience.

I send my subscribers links to 4 experience pages over 4 days. There, they can download the music for free, watch behind the scenes videos, play games, win prizes, and more. I wanted people to be able to take a moment to themselves and get present to what’s important to them.

The experience will be available on October 10th for World Mental Health Day 2020.

 

If You’re Reading This…

 

If you’ve ever felt like this, you’re not alone in what you’re feeling, and you don’t have to be alone going through it. If you’re one of the strong ones, check in on your friends and family. Let them know you’re a safe space and that they could talk to you about anything and you’d still love them.  Sometimes we just need to hear that. I’m going to keep making myself vulnerable in my music. Because there’s people who desperately need that.

If you’re reading this, I could use your help too. If you know someone who could benefit from this message and this music, please contact me [itofficialchannel@gmail.com].

Stay up!

Travis Meade
– I.T. Official

Stay in tune

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I’m Trapped in My Life… Get Me Out!

I’m Trapped in My Life… Get Me Out!

I’m Trapped in My Life… Get Me Out!

Sunday.Jun.21.2020

 

A Shared Struggle

 

I’ve had the unique privilege of connecting with millions of people worldwide over the topic of suicide prevention after a video of mine went viral on Facebook, and I see from all the comments and messages that mental illness is a silent killer. Countless people quietly suffer, trying to be strong for their family and friends, afraid to talk about their pain. Somewhere out there, a single mother of 3 feels like a failure and is struggling to hold it together. A teenager feels unloved and insignificant in this huge world. A war veteran struggles to re-assimilate to every-day life. Depression does not discriminate, and it can be hard to pick ourselves up sometimes.

 

Infinite T See Something Say Something EP Album Art

 

“Okay Fine… HELP!”

 

I don’t like help. Who needs help? I’m a grown ass man. I got this shit. I can handle my feelings. Matter of fact, what feelings? I’m a rock. I’m a boulder…

 

…A boulder sliding backwards down the side of a mountain.

 

Why is mental health associated with weakness instead of power? The stigma attached to a therapist is enough to drive people away. Before I experienced it for myself, when someone would say they see a therapist, the first question that naturally comes to my mind is, “Why?” Then I’d start considering, “is this person unstable? Are they crazy? Did a judge order them to go see a therapist?” I had no positive reference as to why someone could see a therapist without being certified crazy first. I never knew how much I would benefit from having a safe space, too.

 

A Safe Space

 

Imagine a place where you can speak your soul and be heard without any judgement or chance of it coming back to bite you. A place where you can vent your true feelings about about your boss, about your husband or wife, even about your kids. Think of all the things you feel inside that you wanted to say but couldn’t, wouldn’t, or shouldn’t say. Imagine a place where it’s okay to feel those things for a while and eventually you can relieve that pain and return to your life refreshed.

 

For me, half of the value of going to therapy is having a safe space. I had pretty cool friends and a pretty supportive family, it’s not like I felt unsafe around them. But sometimes they were the ones frustrating me and I needed to go somewhere else. Sometimes I needed to talk about something personal, something that might make my friends or family look at me differently if I brought it up. Sometimes I needed more help than my people were able to give me. Either way, I was able to dump my stress with a therapist, process my emotions, and come back to my life with a new perspective. The people in my life were less affected by my negativity; for a while, no one even knew I was seeing a therapist, but they reaped the benefits of a happier me.

 

Part of my goal with this article is to help create a safe space for important conversations about our mental health. I believe it would benefit everyone if we talked openly about mental health, but the stigma often drives away the conversation. Many people feel the world is still not a safe space for that kind of vulnerability, that it can cause more harm than good. Maybe they’re right, but my experience has been different. Despite the risk of sharing my feelings, my life depends on it.

 

 

Where to Start

 

Calling your Local Warm Line could be a great place to begin the search for a safe place. This is a local resource for mental health needs. They can spend time on the phone and help you cope, even if it’s not an emergency. (The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is also available for emergencies at 1-800-273-8255). The Warm Line itself could even become a safe place for some people. Help is more accessible and affordable than some might think, and there are many options available depending on your needs. Click here to download my Mental Health Checklist with a list of contacts for mental health needs.

 

Here’s to us all finding a safe place and keeping it sacred.

Infinite T This is I.T. Album Artwork

Stay in tune

Work With Me

You Are Not Alone.

You Are Not Alone.

You Are Not Alone.

Wednesday.Jun.10.2020
 

A Shared Struggle

 

I’ve had the unique privilege of connecting with millions of people worldwide over the topic of suicide prevention after a video of mine went viral on Facebook, and I see from all the comments and messages that mental illness is a silent killer. Countless people quietly suffer, trying to be strong for their family and friends, afraid to talk about their pain. Somewhere out there, a single mother of 3 feels like a failure and is struggling to hold it together. A teenager feels unloved and insignificant in this huge world. A war veteran struggles to re-assimilate to every-day life. Depression does not discriminate, and it can be hard to pick ourselves up sometimes.

 

Infinite T See Something Say Something EP Album Art
 

“Okay Fine… HELP!”

 

I don’t like help. Who needs help? I’m a grown ass man. I got this shit. I can handle my feelings. Matter of fact, what feelings? I’m a rock. I’m a boulder…

 

…A boulder sliding backwards down the side of a mountain.

 

Why is mental health associated with weakness instead of power? The stigma attached to a therapist is enough to drive people away. Before I experienced it for myself, when someone would say they see a therapist, the first question that naturally comes to my mind is, “Why?” Then I’d start considering, “is this person unstable? Are they crazy? Did a judge order them to go see a therapist?” I had no positive reference as to why someone could see a therapist without being certified crazy first. I never knew how much I would benefit from having a safe space, too.

 

A Safe Space

 

Imagine a place where you can speak your soul and be heard without any judgement or chance of it coming back to bite you. A place where you can vent your true feelings about about your boss, about your husband or wife, even about your kids. Think of all the things you feel inside that you wanted to say but couldn’t, wouldn’t, or shouldn’t say. Imagine a place where it’s okay to feel those things for a while and eventually you can relieve that pain and return to your life refreshed.

 

For me, half of the value of going to therapy is having a safe space. I had pretty cool friends and a pretty supportive family, it’s not like I felt unsafe around them. But sometimes they were the ones frustrating me and I needed to go somewhere else. Sometimes I needed to talk about something personal, something that might make my friends or family look at me differently if I brought it up. Sometimes I needed more help than my people were able to give me. Either way, I was able to dump my stress with a therapist, process my emotions, and come back to my life with a new perspective. The people in my life were less affected by my negativity; for a while, no one even knew I was seeing a therapist, but they reaped the benefits of a happier me.

 

Part of my goal with this article is to help create a safe space for important conversations about our mental health. I believe it would benefit everyone if we talked openly about mental health, but the stigma often drives away the conversation. Many people feel the world is still not a safe space for that kind of vulnerability, that it can cause more harm than good. Maybe they’re right, but my experience has been different. Despite the risk of sharing my feelings, my life depends on it.

 

 

Where to Start

 

Calling your Local Warm Line could be a great place to begin the search for a safe place. This is a local resource for mental health needs. They can spend time on the phone and help you cope, even if it’s not an emergency. (The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is also available for emergencies at 1-800-273-8255). The Warm Line itself could even become a safe place for some people. Help is more accessible and affordable than some might think, and there are many options available depending on your needs. Click here to download my Mental Health Checklist with a list of contacts for mental health needs.

 

Here’s to us all finding a safe place and keeping it sacred.

Infinite T This is I.T. Album Artwork

Stay in tune

Work With Me